Messier 1 – Crab Nebula

This deep sky object is called the Crab Nebula. It is a supernova remnant that was the first Messier Object – M1. It is located in the Constellation Taurus and is a Milky Way Galaxy resident that is about 6500 light years away. Messier was tired of finding objects like this when he was searching for Comets, so he devised a list of deplorables like this in order to avoid them in the future. I managed to tease out some interesting detail in M1 by using three extremely narrow band filters (Oxygen, Hydrogen and Nitrogen) and assigning them to colors that would enhance the detail in the image. One advantage of narrow band filters is that they filter out moon glow which was almost at it’s peak during these imaging sessions. The 25 stacked exposures totaled about 12.5 hours through a six inch refractor at f8 with a 1200mm focal length. More details are available at my Astrobin site. http://astrob.in/287183/0/

M1-WATERMARK

The Spaghetti Nebula – Simeis 147

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From Wikipedia:

Simeis 147, also known as the Spaghetti Nebula, SNR G180.0-01.7 or Sharpless 2-240, is a supernova remnant (SNR) in the Milky Way, straddling the border between the constellations Auriga and Taurus. Discovered in 1952 at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory using a 25-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, it is difficult to observe due to its extremely low brightness.

The nebulous area is fairly large with an almost spherical shell and filamentary structure.  The remnant has an apparent diameter of approximately 3 degrees, an estimated distance of approximately 3000 (±350) light-years, and an age of approximately 40,000 years.

It is believed that after its stellar explosion a rapidly spinning neutron star known as pulsar PSR J0538+2817 was left behind in the nebula core, emitting a strong radio signal.

Acquisition information can be found here…

http://www.astrobin.com/273407/?nc=user

 

Mosaic of the Cygnus Region of the Milky Way

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This is a mosaic of 18 separate panels taken through an H-Alpha filter with the Rokinon 135mm f2.0 lens piggy backed on the Celestron C11 telescope.  Each panel was produced by stacking 20 images comprised of 5 and 10 minute exposures.  The total exposure time was 45 hours.  The picture includes the Veil Nebula, North American Nebula, Pelican Nebula, Tulip Nebula, Propeller Nebula and the Crescent Nebula in the Constellation Cygnus.  Microsoft ICE was used to assemble the mosaic.  Other software that was used included Adobe Photoshop, Pixinsight, and Maxim DL.

Cone Nebula

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From Wikipedia:

“The Cone Nebula is an H II region in the constellation of Monoceros. It was discovered by William Herschel on December 26, 1785, at which time he designated it H V.27. The nebula is located about 830 parsecs or 2,700 light-years away from Earth. The Cone Nebula forms part of the nebulosity surrounding the Christmas Tree Cluster.”

These images are a stacked composite of 18 thirty minute photos taken with a 4 inch Takahashi refractor in Rowe, NM. They were stacked and processed in Maxim DL, Pixinsight, and Photoshop.  The third image shows the nebula without stars.